All posts by GHCWomensHistoryMonth

Lady Chargers!

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The Lady Chargers of GHC Basketball are a great example of Women’s History in the making!

To read more about their recent advancement to the GCAA Final Four, check out this story in the Six Mile Postor visit the GHC Athletics page to meet the team.

GHC Professor of English, Carla Patterson, says, “Congratulations to the GHC Women’s Basketball Team on advancing to the final four of the regional tournament. Cheer them on Friday night in their next game, which will be held at South Georgia Tech.”

(Carla Patterson also created the featured photo on this post.)

Women’s History Month has officially begun

“…on the face of human history, Women’s History Month is not a beauty mark, but a scar. It is a sign of past hurt and continued healing. I hope for the day the scar vanishes into history and is visible no more.”

-Karen Swallow Prior, The Atlantic, 2013

Women’s History Month has officially begun for 2017, but do we, as a society, really want this month long commemoration?

Read Karen Swallow Prior’s “The End of Women’s History Month,” written in 2013 for The Atlantic. Prior is a professor of English at Liberty University and a research fellow with the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Alice Paul in 1915

Alice Paul and Lucy Burns

“The militant wing of the Suffragists has performed a big service. But for its enterprise and daring suffrage would not have had nearly so wide a publicity during the past few years or made nearly so urgent an appeal.”

-J. D. Barry in the New York Telegram; May 17, 1918 (Adams and Keene xiv)

In 1909, a very nervous Alice Paul (pictured above) attended a protest organized by the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), an English suffragist group. As she had been warned, the police arrested all the ladies involved. While she and the other activists waited in the recreation room of the local precinct, she noticed one of the other ladies was wearing an American flag label pin. Paul approached the lady and introduced herself to Lucy Burns. The two spent the rest of the day sitting atop a billiards table discussing the cause in both England and the United States. They were as different as two women could be. Burn’s brash mannerisms and red-hair must have seemed at odds with Paul’s slight build and quiet demeanor, but that afternoon was the beginning of a close partnership and friendship (Lunardini 16-7). Continue reading Alice Paul and Lucy Burns

Do you know these women?

Most people have heard the term “suffragette,” and Susan B. Anthony’s name is synonymous with women’s rights, but do you know Mrs. Pankhurst? Alice Paul? Over the next months, I plan to introduce you to many of the heroes in the fight for Women’s Rights, and not all of them are women!

If you have suggestions for other Women’s History topics, please share them with me. It’s my hope that this blog will provide our GHC community with an online venue to expand on the exploration of Women’s History happening in our on-campus events.

-Michelle Abbott, Associate Professor of English, GHC

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Image: WSPU leaders, Annie Kenney (left) and Christabel Pankhurst